Cool your alternator

Heat is the greatest enemy of all things electrical, and your alternator is no exception. Alternators come equipped with cooling fans, either internal or external, but with a tightly enclosed engine compartment, high ambient temperature means an even hotter alternator. One way to keep your alternator cool is to build a simple fiberglass shroud that, when fed by a fan and ducting, will supply cool air to the alternator. The classic equation of heat transfer: Q=UAdT simply indicates that the amount of heat transferred per unit area increases directly with the difference in temperature. Cooler air from outside of the…
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Plastic vs. powder coated head

To the editor: A couple of comments about the recent piece by Peter Stoops on recoating a head (Powder coating tames the head, Issue #191). It is nice to know more about powder coating, a process I have been curious about, and I can think of many applications, but I would wish to challenge its use on a head for a number of reasons.     Firstly, I would suggest that on his vessel, he make an executive decision to have every male, no matter how unmanly they may feel, sit down for all deliveries. Splatter is real even if aim…
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Dodge Morgan: First American non-stop circumnavigator

Dodge Morgan: First American non-stop circumnavigator

Dodge Morgan, former Air Force fighter pilot, working journalist and successful entrepreneur, first dreamed of sailing solo non-stop around the world in the 1960s. Morgan spent a couple of years living aboard his 36-foot schooner, Coaster, and sailing from New England, through the Panama Canal to Alaska. Having achieved financial independence by selling his electronics company for a reported $35 million, at the age of 52 Morgan found himself ready to tackle his dream. Up until Morgan’s effort in 1985, there had been no American sailors who had completed a non-stop single-handed passage around the world. Morgan wanted to sail…
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A salute to the fallen crew of Quest

A salute to the fallen crew of Quest

My hands clenched the steering wheel as the radio announcer’s voice broke news of the execution of Scott and Jean Adam, Bob Riggle and Phyllis Macay on Feb. 22 by Somali pirates about 100 miles south of the Yemeni coast. The U.S. Navy had descended on the scene, trying to prevent Quest from approaching the Somali coast, where assistance would have been all but impossible. A scuffle, an act of desperation by the pirates, or maybe a last-ditch effort by the crew to repel the attackers, we will never know for sure. A group of high school sophomores, eager to…
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Halifax Nova Scotia high frequency weather and fax broadcast cease

Canadian Forces MetOc (Meteorology and Oceanography) Halifax ceased high frequency weather and fax broadcasts on Sept. 2, 2010. According to Senior Staff Officer Lt. Darryl Williams, “Canadian naval vessels are no longer using it because they receive weather information by other means. There are no plans to re-instate the HF weather and fax broadcast unless required for urgent military operational needs. The Canadian Coast Guard publication Radio Aids to Marine Navigation has been updated to reflect the status of the Canadian Forces Fleet Weather Broadcast.” Ocean Voyager’s 2011 Ocean Almanac reported this station as being active which we regret was…
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Asked & Answered: Which HF SSB antenna. whip or wire?

Question: I am a ham operator and am looking at ways of installing my rig on my boat. I have a ketch with a fairly short rig, so my wire lengths are all marginal. Plus with all that wire nearby, there is bound to be some interference. The recent article on single-sideband installations (Setting up single sideband, Issue 123, July/Aug. 2002), mentioned the possibility of using a 23-foot fiberglass whip. I wondered if you could tell me how they stack up against using rigging wire. I know the builder of my boat, an Amel 38, installed a whip on the…
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Alden's Malabar X reconstructed

From Ocean Navigator #119 January/February 2002 The call of the sea can reach far inland to unlikely places. Like to a boatyard on the shore of Cayuga Lake in upstate New York. That's where a $1.1 million wooden schooner is nearing completion. She's a reincarnation of John Alden's ocean-racing Malabar X, a victim of Hurricane Bob and the ravages of time. Doug Hazlitt, a seventh-generation grape grower on the family vineyard overlooking Seneca Lake, bought the hulk in 1997. He hoped to fix her up and put her to work in his Seneca Day Sails charter business he had started…
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Schooner America's varied history

When New York Yacht Club Commodore John Stevens ordered the building of America, he could hardly have imagined the remarkable legacy his dream racer would have. In 1851 Stevens asked designer George Steers for a schooner of about 170 tons that could win a 60-mile race )bout the Isle of Wight. Steers designed a very clean two-masted schooner with an LOA of 94 feet, a beam of 22.5 feet, and a draft of 11.5 feet. The stoical old salts of the Royal Yacht Squadron must have needed extra starch for those famous stiff upper lips as they painfully watched Stevens'…
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Thanks to you. we've turned 100

By this stage you're probably sick of hearing about the arrival of the new millennium, the Y2K bug, and the raging debate about whether the 1,000-year cusp date is Dec. 31, 1999, or Dec. 31, 2000 (technically, the second date is correct, but we recognize most people will jump at any pretense for a partysee below for our excuse). So let's change the focus by a factor of 10. Forget about things millennialwe're going to bring back the human scale and talk about things centennial. For most people, 100 is a number they can come to grips with. For example,…
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Barking dog' navigation aids pilot

As we all know, a good navigator should never fail to take advantage of any cue that aids him in piloting his vessel through hazardous coastal waters, particularly when the weather is thick. Nova Scotian Jock Fleming was one who readily subscribed to this theory. One morning in 1864, as the American Civil War was beginning to wind down, the citizens of Halifax awoke to the news that a Confederate sea-raider, the C.S.S. Tallahassee, John T. Wood commanding, had entered port for repairs. Although Halifax was officially a neutral port, Royal Navy personnel there made little effort to hide their…
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