Wireless VHF interface systems

Wireless VHF interface systems

If you are the skipper of a large yacht, you are keenly aware of the need to have immediate communication capability with all crew and passengers at all times. The quickest, easiest way to make announcements to all onboard, particularly in the event of an emergency, is with a hailer, which is usually nothing more than a large, conical speaker mounted on the mast or other elevated surface. Until recently, hailers have been connected to an intercom system via a long pair of wires, which can be run down inside the mast, through the coach roof and then tacked to…
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High-gain cellular antennas

Getting out on the boat in coastal waters can separate us from important phone calls from family and the office that we’d rather not miss. That is, unless our boat is equipped with a high-gain marine cellular antenna. The Marine weBoost Drive Reach Cell Signal Booster is a great example of the accessibility and power available for cell phones within 15 to 20 miles offshore. “This kit includes a high-gain outside antenna for either the RFI 82-inch Whip or the Poynting high-gain omni antenna,” explained Marketing Director Chad Steglich of Powerful Signal of Hurricane, Utah. The 29.5-inch Poynting OMNI-493 UV-stable…
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Chartplotter battery monitoring

Battery monitoring on our vessels is an obsession comparable to keeping an eye on the wind indicator and the sail telltales. With all of us skippers fussing over slight changes in battery charge several times a day while on passage, we would expect a horde of manufacturers pandering to us with battery monitoring systems compatible with our chartplotters, right? Nope! Of all the marine and recreational battery monitoring systems on the market, only one offers compatibility with our chartplotters: the Victron Cerbo GX, “a hub for all energy on board.” To be sure, other monitoring systems have jumped straight ahead…
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Stand-alone AIS units

Stand-alone AIS units

A stand-alone AIS transceiver is a must for both coastal and offshore sailing craft, especially around large harbors with lots of ship traffic and sometimes dense fog. AIS-equipped VHF radios are generally limited to receiving AIS transmissions and displaying them either on a small screen or a separate chartplotter.  To alert another vessel, the operator can either call by VHF radio or activate the DSC (digital select calling) function, which transmits the vessel’s name and position with the vessel’s Maritime Mobile Service Identities code. The advantage of a self-contained AIS transceiver is obvious: Every AIS-equipped vessel in your area is…
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